GossipSloth

20 Facts About the White House

source
1

The White House is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States.

An official residence is the residence at which a nation's head of state, head of government, governor or other senior figure officially resides.

President Trump Delivers Remarks at A Conversation with The Women in America by The White House

source
2

It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., and has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as "Washington", "the District", or simply "D.C.", is the capital of the United States.

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

The term federal city is a title for certain cities in Germany, Switzerland, the Russian Federation, India, and the United States.

President Trump Meets with President Nursultan Nazarbayev by The White House

source
3

The term White House is often used as a metonym for the president and his advisers, as in "The White House announced that..."

Metonymy is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is called not by its own name, but rather by the name of something associated in meaning with that thing or concept.

source
4

The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban in the neoclassical style.

James Hoban was an Irish architect, best known for designing the White House in Washington, D.C.

source
5

Construction took place between 1792 and 1800 using Aquia Creek sandstone painted white.

Aquia Creek sandstone is a type of brown to light-gray freestone used extensively in building construction in Washington, D.C. in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

source
6

When Thomas Jefferson moved into the house in 1801, he added low colonnades on each wing that concealed stables and storage.

Thomas Jefferson was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

In classical architecture, a colonnade denotes a long sequence of columns joined by their entablature, often free-standing, or part of a building.

source
7

In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior.

The War of 1812 was a military conflict that lasted from June 18, 1812 to February 18, 1815, fought between the United States of America and the United Kingdom, its North American colonies, and its Native American allies.

source
8

Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed Executive Residence in October 1817.

source
9

Exterior construction continued with the addition of the semi-circular South portico in 1824 and the North portico in 1829.

A portico is a porch leading to the entrance of a building, or extended as a colonnade, with a roof structure over a walkway, supported by columns or enclosed by walls.

source
10

Because of crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had all work offices relocated to the newly constructed West Wing in 1901.

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

source
11

Eight years later in 1909, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office, which was eventually moved as the section was expanded.

William Howard Taft served as the 27th President of the United States and as the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, the only person to have held both offices.

source
12

In the main mansion, the third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers.

An attic is a space found directly below the pitched roof of a house or other building; an attic may also be called a sky parlor or a garret.

A hip roof, hip-roof or hipped roof, is a type of roof where all sides slope downwards to the walls, usually with a fairly gentle slope.

source
13

A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; Jefferson's colonnades connected the new wings.

source
14

East Wing alterations were completed in 1946, creating additional office space.

source
15

By 1948, the house's load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure.

source
16

Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled and a new internal load-bearing steel frame constructed inside the walls.

Steel frame is a building technique with a "skeleton frame" of vertical steel columns and horizontal I-beams, constructed in a rectangular grid to support the floors, roof and walls of a building which are all attached to the frame.

source
17

Once this work was completed, the interior rooms were rebuilt.

source
18

The modern-day White House complex includes the Executive Residence, West Wing, East Wing, the Eisenhower Executive Office Building—the former State Department, which now houses offices for the President's staff and the Vice President—and Blair House, a guest residence.

The Eisenhower Executive Office Building — formerly known as the Old Executive Office Building and even earlier as the State, War, and Navy Building — is a U.S. government building situated just west of the White House in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C. Maintained by the General Services Administration, it is occupied by the Executive Office of the President, including the Office of the Vice President of the United States.

The President's Guest House, commonly known as Blair House, is a complex of four formerly separate buildings—Blair House, Lee House, Peter Parker House, and 704 Jackson Place—located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.

source
19

The Executive Residence is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement.

source
20

The property is a National Heritage Site owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park.

The National Park Service is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all U.S. national parks, many American national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.

President's Park, located in Washington, D.C., encompasses the White House including the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, the Treasury Building, and grounds; the White House Visitor Center; Lafayette Square; and The Ellipse.

8 Facts About Synagogues
8 Facts About Marcus Allen
4 Facts About the Great Artesian Basin
12 Facts About Great Basin National Park
10 Facts About Tranquilizer
16 Facts About Liberal Democrats
6 Facts About the Liberal Democratic Party
3 Facts About Alternative Schools
18 Facts About Kanye West
10 Facts About Addicks, Houston
6 Facts About the Brazilian Highlands
14 Facts About O. J. Simpson
4 Facts About School Choice
7 Facts About Lost in Translation