GossipSloth

Syringes

1

A syringe is a simple reciprocating pump consisting of a plunger that fits tightly within a cylindrical tube.

A reciprocating pump is a class of positive-displacement pumps that includes the piston pump, plunger pump, and diaphragm pump.

How to Read a Syringe 3 ml, 1 ml, Insulin, & 5 ml/cc | Reading a Syringe Plunger by RegisteredNurseRN

2

The plunger can be linearly pulled and pushed along the inside of the tube, allowing the syringe to take in and expel liquid or gas through a discharge orifice at the front end of the tube.

A liquid is a nearly incompressible fluid that conforms to the shape of its container but retains a constant volume independent of pressure.

Gas is one of the four fundamental states of matter.

MEDICINE in a Nutshell: IV Cannulae, Syringes & Needles by MEDICINE in a Nutshell

3

The open end of the syringe may be fitted with a hypodermic needle, a nozzle, or a tubing to help direct the flow into and out of the barrel.

A hypodermic needle, one of a category of medical tools which enter the skin, called sharps, is a very thin, hollow tube with a sharp tip that contains a small opening at the pointed end.

A nozzle is a device designed to control the direction or characteristics of a fluid flow as it exits an enclosed chamber or pipe.

A barrel or cask is a hollow cylindrical container with a bulging center, longer than it is wide.

4

Syringes are frequently used in clinical medicine to administer injections, infuse intravenous drugs into the bloodstream, apply compounds such as glue or lubricant, and draw/measure liquids.

The circulatory system, also called the cardiovascular system or the vascular system, is an organ system that permits blood to circulate and transport nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hormones, and blood cells to and from the cells in the body to provide nourishment and help in fighting diseases, stabilize temperature and pH, and maintain homeostasis.

Adhesive, also known as glue, cement, mucilage, or paste, is any non metallic substance applied to one or both surfaces of two separate items that binds them together and resists their separation.

A drug is any substance other than food, that when inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, absorbed via a patch on the skin or dissolved under the tongue causes a physiological change in the body.

5

The word "syringe" is derived from the Greek σύριγξ via back-formation of a new singular from its Greek-type plural "syringes".

In etymology, back-formation is the process of creating a new lexeme by removing actual or supposed affixes.

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