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the Statue of Liberty

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The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor in New York City, in the United States.

Neoclassicism is the name given to Western movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that draw inspiration from the "classical" art and culture of Ancient Greece or Ancient Rome.

New York Harbor, part of the Port of New York and New Jersey, is at the mouth of the Hudson River where it empties into New York Bay and into the Atlantic Ocean at the East Coast of the United States.

Liberty Island is a federally owned island in Upper New York Bay in the United States, best known as the location of the Statue of Liberty.

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The copper statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, a French sculptor, was built by Gustave Eiffel and dedicated on October 28, 1886.

Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi was a French sculptor who is best known for designing Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty.

Deconstructing History: Statue of Liberty | History by HISTORY

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It was a gift to the United States from the people of France.

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The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776.

Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans.

A tabula ansata or tabella ansata is a tablet with dovetail handles.

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A broken chain lies at her feet.

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The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States, and was a welcoming sight to immigrants arriving from abroad.

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Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician Édouard René de Laboulaye, who is said to have commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples.

Édouard René Lefèbvre de Laboulaye was a French jurist, poet, author and anti-slavery activist.

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He may have been minded to honor the Union victory in the American Civil War and the end of slavery.

The American Civil War was a civil war in the United States fought from 1861 to 1865.

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Due to the post-war instability in France, work on the statue did not commence until the early 1870s.

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In 1875, Laboulaye proposed that the French finance the statue and the Americans provide the site and build the pedestal.

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Bartholdi completed the head and the torch-bearing arm before the statue was fully designed, and these pieces were exhibited for publicity at international expositions.

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The torch-bearing arm was displayed at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876, and in Madison Square Park in Manhattan from 1876 to 1882.

The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair in the United States, was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from May 10 to November 10, 1876, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia.

Madison Square is a public square formed by the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Broadway at 23rd Street in the New York City borough of Manhattan.

Manhattan is the most densely populated borough of New York City, its economic and administrative center, and the city's historical birthplace.

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Fundraising proved difficult, especially for the Americans, and by 1885 work on the pedestal was threatened due to lack of funds.

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Publisher Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World started a drive for donations to complete the project that attracted more than 120,000 contributors, most of whom gave less than a dollar.

Joseph Pulitzer was a Hungarian-American newspaper publisher of the St. Louis Post Dispatch and the New York World.

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The statue was constructed in France, shipped overseas in crates, and assembled on the completed pedestal on what was then called Bedloe's Island.

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The statue's completion was marked by New York's first ticker-tape parade and a dedication ceremony presided over by President Grover Cleveland.

A ticker tape parade is a parade event held in a built-up urban setting, allowing large amounts of shredded paper to be thrown from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a celebratory effect by the snowstorm-like flurry.

Stephen Grover Cleveland was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States.

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The statue was administered by the United States Lighthouse Board until 1901 and then by the Department of War; since 1933 it has been maintained by the National Park Service.

The United States Lighthouse Board was the second agency of the US Federal Government, under the Department of Treasury, responsible for the construction and maintenance of all lighthouses and navigation aids in the United States, between 1852 and 1910.

The National Park Service is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all U.S. national parks, many American national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.

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Public access to the balcony surrounding the torch has been barred for safety reasons since 1916.

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