17 Facts About Stanford University


Stanford University, officially Leland Stanford Junior University, is a private research university in Stanford, California, adjacent to Palo Alto and between San Jose and San Francisco.

San Francisco, officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California and the only consolidated city-county in California.

Palo Alto is a charter city located in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County, California, in the San Francisco Bay Area of the United States.

A census-designated place is a concentration of population defined by the United States Census Bureau for statistical purposes only.

Stanford University Campus Tour by Stanford


Its 8,180-acre campus is one of the largest in the United States.

The United States of America, commonly referred to as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

123rd Stanford University Commencement by Stanford


Stanford also has land and facilities elsewhere.


The university was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year.

Typhoid fever, also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella Typhi that causes symptoms which may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure.

Jane Lathrop Stanford was a co-founder of Stanford University in 1885 along with her husband, Leland Stanford, as a memorial to their only child, Leland Stanford Jr., who died in 1884 at the age of 15.

Leland Stanford Jr., known as Leland DeWitt Stanford until age nine, is the namesake of Stanford University, adjacent to Palo Alto, California, United States.


Stanford was a former Governor of California and U.S. Senator; he made his fortune as a railroad tycoon.

A governor is, in most cases, a public official with the power to govern the executive branch of a non-sovereign or sub-national level of government, ranking under the head of state.


The school admitted its first students 125 years ago on October 1, 1891, as a coeducational and non-denominational institution.

A non-denominational person or organization is not restricted to any particular or specific religious denomination.


Stanford University struggled financially after Leland Stanford's death in 1893 and again after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

The 1906 San Francisco earthquake struck the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on April 18 with an estimated moment magnitude of 7.8 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of XI.


Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would later be known as Silicon Valley.

Silicon Valley is a nickname for the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay Area, which is located in the part of the U.S. state of California known as Northern California.

World War I, also known as the First World War, or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.


The rise of Silicon Valley helped Stanford become one of the world's most prestigious universities.


The university is also one of the top fundraising institutions in the country, becoming the first school to raise more than a billion dollars in a year.


There are three academic schools that have both undergraduate and graduate students and another four professional schools.


Students compete in 36 varsity sports, and the university is one of two private institutions in the Division I FBS Pac-12 Conference.

The Pac-12 Conference is a collegiate athletic conference that operates in the Western United States.


It has gained 109 NCAA team championships, the second-most for a university, 476 individual championships, the most in Division I, and has won the NACDA Directors' Cup, recognizing the university with the best overall athletic team achievement, for 22 consecutive years, beginning in 1994–1995.

The NACDA Learfield Sports Directors' Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities in the United States with the most success in collegiate athletics.


Stanford faculty and alumni have founded a large number of companies that produce more than $2.7 trillion in annual revenue, equivalent to the 10th-largest economy in the world.


It is the alma mater of 30 living billionaires, 17 astronauts, and 20 Turing Award laureates.

The ACM A.M. Turing Award is an annual prize given by the Association for Computing Machinery to "an individual selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community".

Alma mater is an allegorical Latin phrase for a university or college.


It is also one of the leading producers of members of the United States Congress.

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States consisting of two chambers: the Senate and the House of Representatives.


Sixty Nobel laureates and seven Fields Medalists have been affiliated with Stanford as students, alumni, faculty or staff.

3 Facts About 375
11 Facts About the January 2015 North American Blizzard
6 Facts About Area Code 956
15 Facts About Australia
11 Facts About Ontario
16 Facts About Aretha Franklin
16 Facts About the Green Bay Packers
6 Facts About Wayne State University
11 Facts About the Russian Orthodox Church