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Poseidon

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Poseidon was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth, god of the sea, storms, earthquakes and

In ancient Greek religion and mythology, the twelve Olympians are the major deities of the Greek pantheon, commonly considered to be Hera, Zeus, Poseidon, Demeter, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Hephaestus, Aphrodite, Hermes, and either Hestia or Dionysus.

An earthquake is the perceptible shaking of the surface of the Earth, resulting from the sudden release of energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves.

Poseidon: The God of Seas - The Olympians - Greek Mythology - See U in History by See U in History / Mythology

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In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes.

Pylos, historically also known under its Italian name Navarino, is a town and a former municipality in Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece.

Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece around the Aegean Sea.

Poseidon: Lord of the Sea - (Greek Mythology Explained) by Mythology & Fiction Explained

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His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

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Poseidon was protector of seafarers, and of many Hellenic cities and colonies.

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In Homer's Iliad, Poseidon supports the Greeks against the Trojans during the Trojan War and in the Odyssey, during the sea-voyage from Troy back home to Ithaca, the Greek hero Odysseus provokes Poseidon's fury by blinding his son, the Cyclops Polyphemus, resulting in Poseidon punishing him with storms, the complete loss of his ship and companions, and a ten-year delay.

Homer is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the semi-legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of Greek literature.

In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.

Ithaca or Ithaka is a Greek island located in the Ionian Sea, off the northeast coast of Kefalonia and to the west of continental Greece.

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Poseidon is also the subject of a Homeric hymn.

The Homeric Hymns are a collection of thirty-three anonymous ancient Greek hymns celebrating individual gods.

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In Plato's Timaeus and Critias, the island of Atlantis was Poseidon's domain.

Atlantis is a fictional island mentioned within an allegory on the hubris of nations in Plato's works Timaeus and Critias, where it represents the antagonist naval power that besieges "Ancient Athens", the pseudo-historic embodiment of Plato's ideal state.

Plato was a philosopher in Classical Greece and the founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.

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