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Philadelphia

1

Philadelphia is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872 and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016.

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States.

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2

Philadelphia is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware Valley—a region located in the Northeastern United States at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers with 7.2 million people residing in the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

The Northeastern United States, also referred to as the American Northeast or simply the Northeast, is a geographical region of the United States of America bordered to the north by Canada, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the south by the Southern United States, and to the west by the Midwestern United States.

The Eastern United States, commonly referred to as the American East or simply the East, is a region roughly coinciding with the boundaries of the United States established in the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which bounded the new country to the west along the Mississippi River.

The Schuylkill River is an important river running west to east in eastern Pennsylvania, which was improved by navigations into the Schuylkill Canal.

Philadelphia Vacation Travel Guide | Expedia by Expedia

3

In 1682, William Penn, an English Quaker, founded the city to serve as capital of the Pennsylvania Colony.

William Penn was an English real estate entrepreneur, philosopher, early Quaker and founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Quakers are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements generally known as the Religious Society of Friends.

4

Philadelphia played an instrumental role in the American Revolution as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and the Constitution in 1787.

The American Revolution was a political upheaval that took place between 1765 and 1783 during which colonists in the Thirteen American Colonies rejected the British monarchy and aristocracy, overthrew the authority of Great Britain, and founded the United States of America.

5

Several other key Philadelphia events during the Revolution include the First and Second Continental Congress, the preservation of the Liberty Bell, the Battle of Germantown, the Siege of Fort Mifflin, and the Philadelphia Convention.

The Siege of Fort Mifflin or Siege of Mud Island Fort from September 26 to November 16, 1777 saw British land batteries commanded by Captain John Montresor and a British naval squadron under Vice Admiral Lord Richard Howe attempt to capture an American fort in the Delaware River commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Smith.

Fort Mifflin, originally called Fort Island Battery and also known as Mud Island Fort, was commissioned in 1771 and sits on Mud Island on the Delaware River below Philadelphia, Pennsylvania near Philadelphia International Airport.

The Second Continental Congress was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that started meeting in the summer of 1775, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

6

Philadelphia was one of the nation's capitals in the Revolutionary War, and served as temporary U.S. capital while Washington, D.C., was under construction.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as "Washington", "the District", or simply "D.C.", is the capital of the United States.

The term federal city is a title for certain cities in Germany, Switzerland, the Russian Federation, India, and the United States.

7

In the 19th century, Philadelphia became a major industrial center and railroad hub that grew from an influx of European immigrants.

8

The majority of European immigrants have come from Ireland, Italy and Germany—the three largest reported ancestry groups in the city as of 2015.

9

The city became a prime destination for African Americans during the Great Migration of the 20th century, as well as Puerto Ricans, surpassing two million occupants by 1950.

African Americans are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the Black racial groups of Africa.

10

The area's many universities and colleges make Philadelphia a top international study destination, as the city has evolved into an educational and economic hub.

11

With a gross domestic product of $388 billion, Philadelphia ranks ninth among world cities and fourth in the nation.

12

Philadelphia is the center of economic activity in Pennsylvania and is home to seven Fortune 1000 companies.

Fortune 1000 is a reference to a list maintained by the American business magazine Fortune.

13

The Philadelphia skyline is growing, with a market of almost 81,900 commercial properties in 2016 including several nationally prominent skyscrapers.

A skyscraper is a tall, continuously habitable building of over 10 floors, mostly designed for office, commercial and residential uses.

14

The city is known for its arts, culture, and rich history, attracting over 41 million domestic tourists alone in 2015.

15

Philadelphia has more outdoor sculptures and murals than any other American city.

A mural is any piece of artwork painted or applied directly on a wall, ceiling or other large permanent surface.

Sculpture is the branch of the visual arts that operates in three dimensions.

16

Fairmount Park, when combined with the adjacent Wissahickon Valley Park in the same watershed, is one of the largest contiguous urban park areas in the United States.

An urban park or metropolitan park, also known as a municipal park or a public park, public open space, or municipal gardens, is a park in cities and other incorporated places to offer recreation and green space to residents of, and visitors to, the municipality.

Wissahickon Valley Park contains 2,042 acres of parkland in Northwest Philadelphia, including the Wissahickon Creek from its confluence with the Schuylkill River to the northwestern boundary of the city with eastern Montgomery County.

A park is an area of natural, semi-natural, or planted space set aside for human enjoyment and recreation or for the protection of wildlife or natural habitats.

17

The 67 National Historic Landmarks in the city helped account for the $10 billion generated by tourism.

A National Historic Landmark is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance.

18

Philadelphia is the birthplace of the United States Marine Corps, and is also the home of many U.S. firsts, including the first library, first hospital and medical school, first Capital, first stock exchange, first zoo, and first business school.

The United States Marine Corps is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for providing power projection, using the mobility of the United States Navy, by Congressional mandate, to deliver rapidly, combined-arms task forces on land, at sea, and in the air.

The United States Marine Corps, also known as the United States Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting amphibious operations with the United States Navy.

A stock exchange or bourse is an exchange where stock brokers and traders can buy and/or sell stocks, bonds, and other securities.

19

Philadelphia is the only World Heritage City in the United States.

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