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20 Facts About Lyndon B. Johnson

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Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician who served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969, assuming the office after serving as the 37th Vice President of the United States under President John F. Kennedy from 1961 to 1963.

The Vice President of the United States is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the Federal government as President of the Senate under Article One, Section Three, Paragraph Four of the United States Constitution.

John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963.

Lyndon Johnson MURDERED John F. Kennedy by SOWELLPOLITICS

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A Democrat from Texas, he also served as a United States Representative and as the Majority Leader in the United States Senate.

The United States Senate is a legislative chamber in the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the House of Representatives makes up the U.S. Congress.

A senate is a deliberative assembly, often the upper house or chamber of a bicameral legislature or parliament.

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population.

Lyndon B. Johnson - The accidental president by 10Garmonbozia01

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Johnson is one of only four people who have served in all four federal elected positions.

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Born in a farmhouse in Stonewall, Texas, Johnson was a high school teacher and worked as a Congressional aide before winning election to the House of Representatives in 1937.

Stonewall is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Gillespie County, Texas, United States.

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He won election to the Senate in 1948, and was appointed the position of Senate Majority Whip in 1951.

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He became the Senate Minority Leader in 1953 and the Senate Majority Leader in 1955.

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As a leader in the Senate, Johnson became known for his domineering personality and the "Johnson treatment", his aggressive coercion of powerful politicians to advance legislation.

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Johnson ran for the Democratic nomination in the 1960 presidential election.

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Although unsuccessful, he was chosen by then-Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts to be his running mate.

Massachusetts mass-É™-CHOO-sits; officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the northeastern United States.

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They went on to win a close election over the Republican ticket of Richard Nixon and Henry Cabot Lodge Jr., and Johnson was sworn in as Vice President on January 20, 1961.

Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. sometimes referred to as Henry Cabot Lodge II, was a Republican United States Senator from Massachusetts and a U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, South Vietnam, West Germany, and the Holy See.

Richard Milhous Nixon was an American politician who served as the 37th President of the United States from 1969 until 1974, when he became the only U.S. president to resign from office.

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On November 22, 1963, Johnson succeeded Kennedy as President following the latter's assassination.

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Johnson won a landslide re-election in 1964, defeating Republican Senator Barry Goldwater of Arizona.

Barry Morris Goldwater was an American politician and businessman who was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona and the Republican Party's nominee for President of the United States in the 1964 election.

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In domestic policy, Johnson designed the "Great Society" legislation by upholding civil rights, public broadcasting, Medicare, Medicaid, aid to education, the arts, urban and rural development, public services, and his "War on Poverty".

The War on Poverty is the unofficial name for legislation first introduced by United States President Lyndon B. Johnson during his State of the Union address on January 8, 1964.

Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from infringement by governments, social organizations, and private individuals.

The Great Society was a set of domestic programs in the United States launched by Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964–65.

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Assisted in part by a growing economy, the War on Poverty helped millions of Americans rise above the poverty line during his administration.

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Civil rights bills that he signed into law banned racial discrimination in public facilities, interstate commerce, the workplace, and housing; the Voting Rights Act prohibited certain requirements in southern states used to disenfranchise African Americans.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a landmark piece of federal legislation in the United States that prohibits racial discrimination in voting.

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With the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, the country's immigration system was reformed, encouraging greater immigration from regions other than Europe.

The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, also known as the Hart–Celler Act, changed the way quotas were allocated by ending the National Origins Formula that had been in place in the United States since the Emergency Quota Act of 1921.

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Johnson's presidency marked the peak of modern liberalism after the New Deal era.

The New Deal was a series of social liberal programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later.

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In foreign policy, Johnson escalated American involvement in the Vietnam War.

The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and known in Vietnam as Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a war that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975.

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In 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, which granted Johnson the power to use military force in Southeast Asia without having to ask for an official declaration of war.

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The number of American military personnel in Vietnam increased dramatically, from 16,000 advisors in non-combat roles in 1963 to 525,000 in 1967, many in combat roles.

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