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7 Facts About Loving v. Virginia

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Loving v. Virginia, 388 U.S. 1, is a landmark civil rights decision of the United States Supreme Court, which invalidated laws prohibiting interracial marriage.

The United States of America, commonly referred to as the United States or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from infringement by governments, social organizations, and private individuals.

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The case was brought by Mildred Loving, a black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, who had been sentenced to a year in prison in Virginia for marrying each other.

Loving v. Virginia: No Longer a Black and White Story by B. Lu

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Their marriage violated the state's anti-miscegenation statute, the Racial Integrity Act of 1924, which prohibited marriage between people classified as "white" and people classified as "colored".

On March 20, 1924, the Virginia General Assembly passed two laws that had arisen out of contemporary concerns about eugenics and race: SB 219, titled "The Racial Integrity Act" and SB 281, "An ACT to provide for the sexual sterilization of inmates of State institutions in certain cases", henceforth referred to as "The Sterilization Act".

Anti-miscegenation laws or miscegenation laws were laws that enforced racial segregation at the level of marriage and intimate relationships by criminalizing interracial marriage and sometimes also sex between members of different races.

Colored is a term used in the United States, predominantly in the South during the racial segregation era, and the United Kingdom to describe people who were not categorized as "white" or those with mixed racial heritage.

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The Supreme Court's unanimous decision determined that this prohibition was unconstitutional, overruling Pace v. Alabama and ending all race-based legal restrictions on marriage in the United States.

Marriage in the United States is a legal, social, and religious institution.

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The decision was followed by an increase in interracial marriages in the U.S., and is remembered annually on Loving Day, June 12.

Interracial marriage in the United States has been fully legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 Supreme Court decision that deemed anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional, with many states choosing to legalize interracial marriage at earlier dates.

Loving Day is an annual celebration held on June 12, the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v.

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It has been the subject of several songs and three movies, including the 2016 film Loving.

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Beginning in 2013, it was cited as precedent in U.S. federal court decisions holding restrictions on same-sex marriage in the United States unconstitutional, including in the 2015 Supreme Court decision Obergefell v. Hodges.

In the United States of America, same-sex marriage has been legal nationwide since June 26, 2015, when the United States Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v.

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