GossipSloth

20 Facts About the Library of Congress

source
1

The Library of Congress is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States.

The United States of America, commonly referred to as the United States or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions.

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States consisting of two chambers: the Senate and the House of Representatives.

A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a country to serve as the preeminent repository of information for that country.

The Library of Congress Is Your Library by LibraryOfCongress

source
2

It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States.

Inside the Library of Congress by LibraryOfCongress

source
3

The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.

Capitol Hill, in addition to being a metonym for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, D.C., stretching easterly in front of the United States Capitol along wide avenues.

The National Audiovisual Conservation Center, also known as the Packard Campus for Audio-Visual Conservation, is the Library of Congress's new audiovisual archive located inside Mount Pony in Culpeper, Virginia.

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as "Washington", "the District", or simply "D.C.", is the capital of the United States.

source
4

The Library of Congress claims to be the largest library in the world.

source
5

Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages.

source
6

Two-thirds of the books it acquires each year are in languages other than English."

source
7

The Library of Congress moved to Washington in 1800, after sitting for eleven years in the temporary national capitals of New York and Philadelphia.

Philadelphia is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the fifth-most populous in the United States, with an estimated population in 2014 of 1,560,297.

source
8

John J. Beckley, who became the first Librarian of Congress, was paid two dollars per day and was required to also serve as the Clerk of the House of Representatives.

The Librarian of Congress is the head of the Library of Congress, appointed by the President of the United States with the advice and consent of the United States Senate, for a term of ten years.

The Clerk of the United States House of Representatives is an officer of the United States House of Representatives, whose primary duty is to act as the chief record-keeper for the House.

John James Beckley was an American political campaign manager and the first Librarian of the United States Congress, from 1802 to 1807.

source
9

The small Congressional Library was housed in the United States Capitol for most of the 19th century until the early 1890s.

The United States Capitol, often called the Capitol Building or Capitol Hill, is the home of the United States Congress, and the seat of the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government.

source
10

Most of the original collection had been destroyed by the British in 1814, during the War of 1812.

The War of 1812 was a military conflict that lasted from June 18, 1812 to February 18, 1815, fought between the United States of America and the United Kingdom, its North American colonies, and its Native American allies.

source
11

To restore its collection in 1815, the library bought from former president Thomas Jefferson his entire personal collection of 6,487 books.

Thomas Jefferson was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States from 1801 to 1809.

source
12

After a period of slow growth, another fire struck the Library in its Capitol chambers in 1851, again destroying a large amount of the collection, including many of Jefferson's books.

source
13

After the American Civil War, the Library of Congress grew rapidly in both size and importance, which sparked a campaign to purchase replacement copies for volumes that had been burned from other sources, collections and libraries.

source
14

The Library received the right of transference of all copyrighted works to have two copies deposited of books, maps, illustrations and diagrams printed in the United States.

Copyright is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution.

A map is a symbolic depiction emphasizing relationships between elements of some space, such as objects, regions, or themes.

source
15

It also began to build its collections of British and other European works and then of works published throughout the English-speaking world.

Approximately 330 to 360 million people speak English as their first language.

source
16

This development culminated in the construction between 1888 and 1894 of a separate, extensive library building across the street from the Capitol, in the Beaux Arts style with fine decorations, murals, paintings, marble halls, columns and steps, carved hardwoods and a stained glass dome.

The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works created from it.

source
17

It included several stories built underground of steel and cast iron stacks.

Cast iron is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.

source
18

The Library's primary mission of researching inquiries made by members of Congress is carried out through the Congressional Research Service, traces its origin to 1914, and was first permanently authorized with the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946.

The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 was the most comprehensive reorganization of the United States Congress in history to that date.

The Congressional Research Service, known as Congress's think tank, is a public policy research arm of the United States Congress.

source
19

Although the Library is open to the public, only high-ranking government officials may check out books and materials.

source
20

The Library promotes literacy and American literature through projects such as the American Folklife Center, American Memory, Center for the Book, and Poet Laureate.

The Center for the Book was founded in 1977 by Daniel J. Boorstin, the Librarian of Congress, in order to use the Library of Congress to promote literacy, libraries, and reading in general, as well as an understanding of the history and heritage of American literature.

The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC was created by Congress in 1976 "to preserve and present American Folklife".

American Memory is an Internet-based archive for public domain image resources, as well as audio, video, and archived Web content.

6 Facts About Primary Education in the United States
4 Facts About the Underground
10 Facts About Zionism
12 Facts About Freemasonry
9 Facts About Homesteading
20 Facts About Crocodile
7 Facts About Electric Power
4 Facts About Rashad Jennings
5 Facts About Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle
8 Facts About the Minneapolis Police Department
8 Facts About the Presidency of Donald Trump
5 Facts About SoftBank Group