GossipSloth

20 Facts About Joseph Stalin

source
1

Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953.

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, abbreviated to USSR, was a socialist state on the Eurasian continent that existed from 1922 to 1991.

Joseph Stalin: Red Terror (Biography) by PANGEA

source
2

Holding the post of the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, he was effectively the dictator of the state.

Central Committee was the common designation of a standing administrative body of communist parties, analogous to a board of directors, whether ruling or non-ruling in the 20th century and of the surviving states in the early 21st century.

The Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, abbreviated in Russian as ЦК, "Tse-ka", was de jure the highest body of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union between Party Congresses.

The Communist Party of the Soviet Union, abbreviated in English as CPSU, was the founding and ruling political party of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

Stalin: Inside the Terror by Dr Alan Brown

source
3

Stalin was one of the seven members of the first Politburo, founded in 1917 in order to manage the Bolshevik Revolution, alongside Lenin, Zinoviev, Kamenev, Trotsky, Sokolnikov, and Bubnov.

The October Revolution, officially known in the Soviet literature as the Great October Socialist Revolution, and commonly referred to as Red October, the October Uprising or the Bolshevik Revolution, was a seizure of state power instrumental in the larger Russian Revolution of 1917.

Leon Trotsky was a Marxist revolutionary and theorist, a Soviet politician who engineered the transfer of all political power to the Soviets with the October Revolution of 1917, and the founding leader of the Red Army.

The Bolsheviks, originally also Bolshevists or Bolsheviki were a faction of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party which split apart from the Menshevik faction at the Second Party Congress in 1903.

source
4

Among the Bolshevik revolutionaries who took part in the Russian Revolution of 1917, Stalin was appointed General Secretary of the party's Central Committee in 1922.

The Russian Revolution was a pair of revolutions in Russia in 1917, which dismantled the Tsarist autocracy and led to the eventual rise of the Soviet Union.

source
5

He managed to consolidate power following the 1924 death of Vladimir Lenin by suppressing Lenin's criticisms and expanding the functions of his role, all the while eliminating any opposition.

Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, better known by the alias Lenin, was a Russian communist revolutionary, politician, and political theorist.

source
6

He remained General Secretary until the post was abolished in 1952, concurrently serving as the Premier of the Soviet Union from 1941 onward.

The chairman or chair is the highest officer of an organized group such as a board, a committee, or a deliberative assembly.

Premier is a title for the head of government in some countries, states and sub-national governments.

source
7

Under Stalin's rule the concept of "Socialism in One Country" became a central tenet of Soviet society, contrary to Leon Trotsky's view that socialism must be spread through continuous international revolutions.

Socialism in One Country was a theory put forth by Joseph Stalin in 1924, elaborated by Nikolai Bukharin in 1925 and finally adopted by the Soviet Union as state policy.

source
8

He replaced the New Economic Policy introduced by Lenin in the early 1920s with a highly centralised command economy, launching a period of industrialization and collectivization that resulted in the rapid transformation of the USSR from an agrarian society into an industrial power.

The New Economic Policy was an economic policy of Soviet Russia proposed by Vladimir Lenin, who described it as a progression towards "state capitalism" within the workers' state of the USSR.

An agrarian society is any society whose economy is based on producing and maintaining crops and farmland.

A planned economy is an economic system in which inputs are based on direct allocation.

source
9

The economic changes coincided with the imprisonment of millions of people in Gulag labour camps.

A labor camp or work camp is a simplified detention facility where inmates are forced to engage in penal labor as a form of punishment under the criminal code.

The Gulag was the government agency that administered the main Soviet forced labour camp systems during the Stalin era, from the 1930s until the 1950s.

source
10

The initial upheaval in agriculture disrupted food production and contributed to the catastrophic Soviet famine of 1932–33, known in Ukraine as the Holodomor.

The Holodomor, also known as the Terror-Famine and Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, and—before the widespread use of the term "Holodomor," as well as currently still—referred to also as the Great Famine, and The Ukrainian Genocide of 1932–33 was a man-made famine in Ukraine in 1932 and 1933 that killed an estimated 2.5–7.5 million Ukrainians, with millions more counted in demographic estimates.

Ukraine is a sovereign state in Eastern Europe, bordered by Russia to the east and northeast, Belarus to the northwest, Poland and Slovakia to the west, Hungary, Romania, and Moldova to the southwest, and the Black Sea and Sea of Azov to the south and southeast, respectively.

The Soviet famine of 1932–33 affected the major grain-producing areas of the Soviet Union, leading to millions of deaths in those areas and severe food shortage throughout the USSR.

source
11

Between 1934 and 1939 he organized and led the "Great Purge", a massive campaign of repression of the party, government, armed forces and intelligentsia, in which millions of so-called "enemies of the working class" were imprisoned, exiled or executed, often without due process.

The intelligentsia is a status class of people engaged in complex mental labors meant to guide, to critique and to assume leadership in shaping the culture and politics of their society.

The Great Purge or the Great Terror was a campaign of political repression in the Soviet Union which occurred from 1936 to 1938.

The term enemy of the people is a fluid designation of political or class opponents of the group using the term.

source
12

Major figures in the Communist Party and government, and many Red Army high commanders, were killed after being convicted of treason in show trials.

The Workers' and Peasants' Red Army was the army and the air force of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, and after 1922 the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

A show trial is a public trial in which the judicial authorities have already determined the guilt of the defendant.

source
13

In August 1939, after failed attempts to conclude anti-Hitler pacts with other major European powers, Stalin entered into a non-aggression pact with Nazi Germany known as the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, that divided their influence and territory within Eastern Europe, resulting in their invasion of Poland in September of that year.

The Invasion of Poland, also known as the September Campaign, or the 1939 Defensive War in Poland, and alternatively the Poland Campaign or Fall Weiss in Germany, was a joint invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, the Free City of Danzig, the Soviet Union, and a small Slovak contingent, that marked the beginning of World War II in Europe.

The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, also known as the Nazi-Soviet Pact or the German–Soviet Non-aggression Pact, was a neutrality pact between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed in Moscow on 23 August 1939 by foreign ministers Joachim von Ribbentrop and Vyacheslav Molotov, respectively.

Nazi Germany is the common English name for the period in German history from 1933 to 1945, when the country was governed by a dictatorship under the control of Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party.

source
14

Stalin violated the pact by invading Bukovina in 1940.

Bukovina is a historical region in Central Europe, divided between Romania and Ukraine, located on the northern slopes of the central Eastern Carpathians and the adjoining plains.

source
15

Germany launched a massive invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941.

source
16

Despite heavy human and territorial losses, Soviet forces managed to halt the Nazi incursion after the decisive Battles of Moscow and Stalingrad.

source
17

After defeating the Axis powers on the Eastern Front, the Red Army captured Berlin in May 1945, effectively ending the war in Europe for the Allies.

source
18

The Soviet Union subsequently emerged as one of two recognized world superpowers, the other being the United States.

source
19

Communist governments loyal to the Soviet Union were established in most countries freed from German occupation by the Red Army, which later constituted the Eastern Bloc.

source
20

Stalin also had close relations with Mao Zedong in China and Kim Il-sung in North Korea.

Mao Zedong or Mao Tse-tung, also known as Chairman Mao, was a Chinese communist revolutionary and founding father of the People's Republic of China, which he ruled as an autocrat styled the Chairman of the Communist Party of China from its establishment in 1949, until his death in 1976.

Kim Il-sung was the supreme leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, commonly referred to as North Korea, for 46 years, from its establishment in 1948 until his death in 1994.

10 Facts About Jacoby Ellsbury
6 Facts About Javier Báez
8 Facts About Leftovers
17 Facts About Albert Pujols
10 Facts About Vladimir Guerrero
3 Facts About Alternative Schools
6 Facts About the Tibetan Plateau
12 Facts About United States Attorney
20 Facts About the White House
5 Facts About the Booker Prize