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Eleanor Roosevelt

1

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was an American politician, diplomat, and activist.

Eleanor Roosevelt: Biography, Quotes, College, Education ... by The Book Archive

2

She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.

The First Lady of the United States, is an unofficial title and position traditionally held by the wife of the President of the United States, concurrent with the president's term of office.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known as FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States, from 1933 to 1945.

The United Nations General Assembly is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations and the only one in which all member nations have equal representation.

Biography: Eleanor Roosevelt by 20C History Project

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President Harry S. Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.

Human rights are moral principles or norms, which describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law.

4

Roosevelt was a member of the prominent American Roosevelt and Livingston families and a niece of President Theodore Roosevelt's.

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. was an American statesman, author, explorer, soldier, naturalist, and reformer who served as the 26th President of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

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She had an unhappy childhood, having suffered the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age.

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At 15, she attended Allenwood Academy in London and was deeply influenced by its feminist headmistress Marie Souvestre.

Marie Souvestre was a feminist educator who sought to develop independent minds in young women.

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Returning to the U.S., she married her fifth cousin once removed, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in 1905.

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The Roosevelts' marriage was complicated from the beginning by Franklin's controlling mother, Sara, and after discovering an affair of her husband's with Lucy Mercer in 1918, Roosevelt resolved to seek fulfillment in a public life of her own.

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She persuaded Franklin to stay in politics after he was stricken with debilitating polio in 1921, which cost him the use of his legs, and Roosevelt began giving speeches and appearing at campaign events in his place.

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Following Franklin's election as Governor of New York in 1928, and throughout the remainder of Franklin's public career in government, Roosevelt regularly made public appearances on his behalf, and as First Lady while her husband served as President, she significantly reshaped and redefined the role of that office during her own tenure and beyond, for future First Ladies.

The Governor of the State of New York is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New York.

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Though widely respected in her later years, Roosevelt was a controversial First Lady at the time for her outspokenness, particularly her stance on racial issues.

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She was the first presidential spouse to hold regular press conferences, write a daily newspaper column, write a monthly magazine column, host a weekly radio show, and speak at a national party convention.

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On a few occasions, she publicly disagreed with her husband's policies.

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She launched an experimental community at Arthurdale, West Virginia, for the families of unemployed miners, later widely regarded as a failure.

Arthurdale is an unincorporated community in Preston County, West Virginia, United States.

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She advocated for expanded roles for women in the workplace, the civil rights of African Americans and Asian Americans, and the rights of World War II refugees.

Civil and political rights are a class of rights that protect individuals' freedom from infringement by governments, social organizations, and private individuals.

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although related conflicts began earlier.

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Following her husband's death, Roosevelt remained active in politics for the rest of her life.

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She pressed the United States to join and support the United Nations and became its first delegate.

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She served as the first chair of the UN Commission on Human Rights, and oversaw the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1948 at the Palais de Chaillot, Paris.

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Later she chaired the John F. Kennedy administration's Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963.

The Presidential Commission on the Status of Women was established to advise the President of the United States on issues concerning the status of women.

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By the time of her death, Roosevelt was regarded as "one of the most esteemed women in the world"; she was called "the object of almost universal respect" in her New York Times obituary.

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